Whaling Ship has Been Grounded in Iceland for 39 years

A huge whaling ship has been grounded in Iceland for 39 years at a place called Skapadalur Valley. The lovely valley has gained notoriety in part because of the ghost ship, which adds to the area’s attractiveness and curiosity. Tourists, photographers, and urban explorers frequent this location, which has become an Icelandic icon.

The Globe IV, a big whaling ship, was built in Norway in 1912. It had both sails and a steam engine on board. The ship was owned by many governments during its life because it was continually up for sale. The Globe IV’s hull was reinforced over time. Because it mostly crossed freezing seas and frequently had to break through the surface ice, this option was chosen.

The ship had a strong steam engine that could keep it moving even in calm conditions, in addition to sails. After WWII, the Globe IV was purchased by an Icelandic family, with whom it stayed until its demise.

The ship’s name was changed to Garar BA 64 in 1963, and it is still known by that name today. Following significant limitations on whaling in the second part of the twentieth century, the owner of the Garðar BA 64 opted to utilize the ship instead to gather herring off the coast of Iceland.

Author: Marakhovets Alexey – LiveJournal @alexio-marziano

Garar BA 64 remained in service for another 18 years when its Icelandic owner determined it was no longer fit for purpose. The ship was pronounced dangerous in 1981, but the owner refused to sink it. Instead, he ran it aground in Patreksfjördur, Iceland’s Skápadalur Valley. The ship Garar BA 64 has been progressively breaking apart since 1981, becoming a fascinating tourist attraction. Because it is possible to get aboard and examine the ship from the interior, this ghost ship is a famous tourist attraction for photographers and travellers.

Author: Marakhovets Alexey – LiveJournal @alexio-marziano

Author: Marakhovets Alexey – LiveJournal @alexio-marziano

Author: Marakhovets Alexey – LiveJournal @alexio-marziano

Author: Marakhovets Alexey – LiveJournal @alexio-marziano

Author: Marakhovets Alexey – LiveJournal @alexio-marziano

Author: Marakhovets Alexey – LiveJournal @alexio-marziano